An analysis of the story about a hobbit bilbo baggins

He lives in an unspecified time that is at once ancient and also very like the Victorian age, with its cozy domestic routines. Like most hobbits, Bilbo is fond of the comforts of home and hearth: He loves good, simple food in abundance, and he loves his pipe and well-furnished hobbit-hole.

An analysis of the story about a hobbit bilbo baggins

An Unexpected Character Analysis: While objectively speaking The Hobbbit is not as good as the The Lord of Rings somehow I cannot help but prefer the rambunctiously lighthearted spirit of The Hobbit.

The emotional center of the film is Bilbo Baggins, a stuffy middle-aged hobbit with a nervous tic. He is not fit for adventure, thus he keeps himself content indoors.

In fact, the entire point of movie is to push this solitary little hobbit out of his complacency and into a place of real growth and change. This happens through a series of perilous tests which propel Bilbo from a static self-centeredness to a willful self-sacrifice.

Bilbo asks about the business details of the adventure. They go to bed with plans for an early start the next morning. Analysis. The novel begins by introducing the story's main character, Bilbo Baggins, establishing the fantasy world of the story, and providing the premise for the journey that structures the plot. Bilbo Baggins - The hero of the story. Bilbo is a hobbit, “a short, human-like person.” Bilbo is a hobbit, “a short, human-like person.” Commonsensical and fastidious, Bilbo leads a quiet life in his comfortable hole at Bag End and, like most hobbits, is content to stay at home. Bilbo Baggins, the Baggins about whom The Hobbit is written, is the child of the hobbit (full context) One morning, Bilbo is sitting outside his .

Since hobbits possess an unfamiliar scent, a miniature size, and a stealthy disposition, Gandalf wants to enlist one of them in their quest to take down the dragon Smaug.

Remembering Bilbo from his adventurous days as a youth, the grey wizard conducts an interview of sorts on his doorstep. But it is not right answers he is after. The wizard is looking beneath the surface, checking to see if this particular hobbit is indeed suited for the task at hand.

While the audience sees only a stuffy contented homebody, somehow Gandalf sees a latent potential for courage. It will take the rest of the movie for us to see this same courage that Gandalf sees.

By the end of their very awkward conversation he has made up his mind: One by one they pile in through his doors. However this is also a test. As the dwarves raid his pantry, Bilbo stands back in horror. He is being robbed blind. But there is something more peculiar going on here: Clearly his thin waistline does not betray him for a glutton.

He has grown complacent. The Dwarves however do know how to make the most of a full pantry. They are merry, raucous, and ravenously hungry. Gandalf has invited the company over because he knows it will shock Bilbo out of his comfortable stasis.

Content with doilies and silverware, the hobbit is now being tested with real life matters. Here sits a nomadic race who have been violently displaced from their homes. By literally taking over his home, the Dwarves demonstrate for Bilbo what it feels like to have your sacred dwelling invaded by an unwanted guest.

Testing Desire Unwilling to sign the contract or join their cause, Bilbo wakes up to an empty home. It is clean and tidy as if they had never been there.

Physically his house remains unchanged from the day before. However the rowdy laughter that filled the rooms and hallways only a night before has now been replaced by an eery silence. Is he happy here at home in his unchanging isolated state?

Does he not desire something more than this, a something he cannot quite place his finger on? While he would rather not embark on a perilous adventure, the alternative is to abandon desire and continue to grow numb to the world around him wanting nothing.

Given the choice between the comfort of safety and the uncertainty of desire, he finally chooses the latter. Remember, this is the choice that enables the entire story to be.

It will not do to simply have Bilbo be kidnapped.

An analysis of the story about a hobbit bilbo baggins

He must willfully and decisively walk out his front door or the story immediately ends. He must desire it.The Hobbit Essay Examples. total results. A Literary Analysis of the Hobbit by J.

R. R. Tolkien. words. The Story and Journey of Bilbo Baggins. words.

An analysis of the story about a hobbit bilbo baggins

1 page. An Analysis of Bilbo Baggins in the Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. words. 2 pages. Bilbo Baggins - The hero of the story. Bilbo is a hobbit, “a short, human-like person.” Bilbo is a hobbit, “a short, human-like person.” Commonsensical and fastidious, Bilbo leads a quiet life in his comfortable hole at Bag End and, like most hobbits, is content to stay at home.

J.R.R. Tolkien portrayed the main character of The Hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, as a child on his trip into adulthood. Throughout The Hobbit, Bilbo Baggins, the protagonist, changes from a childlike hobbit to a fully matured hero.

The emotional center of the film is Bilbo Baggins, a stuffy middle-aged hobbit with a nervous tic. He is not fit for adventure, thus he keeps himself content indoors. In fact, the entire point of movie is to push this solitary little hobbit out of his complacency and into a place of real growth and change.

The Hobbit as an Archetypical Story Essay - The Hobbit as an Archetypical Story The Hobbit, Written in by J.R.R. Tolkien, is an episodic adventure of a hobbit named Bilbo Baggins. Bilbo Baggins, the protagonist of The Hobbit, is one of a race of creatures about half the size of humans, beardless and with hairy feet.

He lives in an unspecified time that is at once ancient and also very like the Victorian age, with its cozy domestic routines.

SparkNotes: The Hobbit: Bilbo