Why write a gratitude journaling

The social benefits are especially significant here because, after all, gratitude is a social emotion.

Why write a gratitude journaling

But as with every major change, it can be hard to make these positive moves stick. It takes about a month of continual work and practice to create a new habit, and practicing an attitude of gratitude is no different.

This is where gratitude journaling comes in. Writing things down makes them more real to us on a psychological level and writing them by handeven more so. Gratitude journals can take a lot of different forms.

You can get fancier with a gratitude spread in your bullet journalcombining writing with art to make your points of happiness more personally meaningful with little sketches and notes. If you need a little help getting started, you can also use a pre-made gratitude journal with templates and prompts to help nudge you along until it becomes a habit.

Gratitude journaling combines the benefits of freewriting—getting your thoughts out without judgment or fear—with the psychological bonuses of meditation. You become better at ignoring the things that go wrong and appreciating the things that go right. Are you always noting down how great it feels to exercise?

Does your gratitude focus on being in nature? Make more time to get outdoors. Do you never, ever seem to be thankful for anything at work?

why write a gratitude journaling

This can help you make broader positive changes to help lead the life you want. Improved Health In addition to helping tune up your outlook on life, practicing mindful gratitude can actually improve your health. Better Relationships While practicing gratitude can help us be more appreciative of the people in our lives, keeping an actual gratitude journal can be even more powerful.

Gratitude journals are a safe space, with no judgment—you can write whatever you want without fear.

Tips for Keeping a Gratitude Journal

Ben does this with his family every day. This is a highlight of the day! Since it takes 21 days to establish a new habit, shoot for at least three weeks of using your gratitude journal every day. And try to find a time that suits you, then stick to it. This helps gratitude journaling become a regular part of your day.

Maybe you want to start the day right, so you do your journaling while you have your morning coffee or during your commute. Maybe you want to release some stress after a long day, so you keep your journal by your bed.

Be detailed and specific with your gratitude items. Instead of writing that worry down, focus on how grateful you are for the wonders of Ny-Quil or cough drops or mint tea with honey. Remember the Little Things Not everything has to be a big production. You can be thankful for little moments, silly moments—just about anything, really.

That you love the way your new socks feel. That the line at Starbucks was only four people long today. That a squirrel fell off the bird feeder and made you laugh. Make It Personal Too often, we focus on the stuff around us instead of the people.

This can be family, friends, colleagues, online acquaintances, strangers, even pets. To take it a step further, consider sharing your thankfulness with those people in the form of a little note. Everyone likes to be appreciated! Appreciate the Act Itself Robert Emmonsa professor at the University of California, Davis, suggests being grateful for the mere act of journaling.

While we want to celebrate our victories, practicing gratitude does the most good when it reminds us to celebrate the little stuff, too. So give yourself some applause for having folded and put away the laundry right after it was washed instead of waiting a week.

Be grateful for the way the air smelled on your morning run. Give thanks for how awesome that ice cream cone tasted this afternoon. Take a moment to appreciate how good it felt to have coffee and laugh with a friend.

Gratitude Stories Want to combine your gratitude journal with your daily pages, freewritingor work on short fiction?This way, gratitude journaling is really different from merely listing a bunch of pleasant things in one’s life.” So why might this particular practice do such good for our minds and bodies?

Emmons points to research showing that translating thoughts into concrete language—whether oral or written—has advantages over just thinking the. Journaling Increases Your Gratitude Even if you start a journal session in a bad mood, the insight writing brings has a subtle way of shifting your mind towards gratitude.

1. Journals help you have a better connection with your values, emotions, and goals. By journal writing about what you believe in, why you believe it, how you feel, and what your goals are, you better understand your relationships to those things.

A gratitude journal or notebook is a place where you write down all those things for which you are grateful. It is a place to focus on all that is positive in your life.

Because Thanksgiving is in November, it seems to be a good month to begin the practice of gratitude journaling. This way, gratitude journaling is really different from merely listing a bunch of pleasant things in one’s life.” So why might this particular practice do such good for our minds and bodies?

Emmons points to research showing that translating thoughts into concrete language—whether oral or written—has advantages over just thinking the. Time Required. 15 minutes per day, at least once per week for at least two weeks.

Studies suggest that writing in a gratitude journal three times per week might actually have a greater impact on our happiness than journaling every day.

Gratitude journal - Wikipedia